More Companies Start to Offer Daycare at Work

A persistent labor shortage and Biden administration incentives for chip makers are motivating more companies to explore on-site childcare By Te-Ping Chen Wall Street Journal On-site daycare is a rarity in American workplaces, but new government incentives and companies eager to attract and retain talent could soon make that benefit more common. The Biden administrationRead More

Long-Robust U.S. Labor Market Shows Signs of Cooling

Long-Robust U.S. Labor Market Shows Signs of Cooling Private-sector readings show job postings receding more than government reports of job openings By Jon Hilsenrath and Bryan Mena Wall Street Journal March 1, 2023 5:56 pm ET Demand for U.S. workers shows signs of slowing, a long-anticipated development that is appearing in private-sector job postings evenRead More

Burned Out, More Americans Are Turning to Part-Time Jobs

The number of people working part-time rose by 1.2 million in December and January—most were people who chose it. ‘25 hours is the new 35.’ PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY ANDREA D’AQUINO FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNAL, GETTY IMAGES (3) By Lauren Weber Feb. 25, 2023 12:00 am ET Part-time work is exploding. The number of AmericansRead More

How Companies Can Lose Workers Without Imposing Layoffs

Issuing subpar performance reviews or requiring relocation can thin ranks By Chip Cutter Feb. 26, 2023 5:30 am ET Companies are shedding some workers without imposing layoffs. Amid a wave of job cuts hitting U.S. white-collar workers, a number of employers are taking other approaches to manage their workforces. Some are adding new restrictions on remote work,Read More

The Truth About the Four-Day Workweek, From People Who Have Tried It

Some bosses say hours worked is the best proxy for productivity. Many workers say output is the only metric that matters.   By Gretchen Tarrant Feb. 25, 2023 5:30 am ET More companies are experimenting with the four-day workweek, and workers who have tried it are divided on how fruitful an abbreviated schedule can be. Hundreds ofRead More

Long-Robust U.S. Labor Market Shows Signs of Cooling

By Jon Hilsenrath WALL STREET JOURNAL March 1, 2023 5:30 am ET Demand for U.S. workers shows signs of slowing, a long-anticipated development that is showing up in private-sector job postings even while official government reports indicate the labor market keeps running hot. ZipRecruiter Inc. and Recruit Holdings Co., two large online recruiting companies, sayRead More

Over Half of US Manufacturing Employees Plan to Leave Their Jobs in 2023: Survey

Feb. 27, 2023 Surveyed factory workers cite PTO and high-tech facilities as top personal priorities for their workplaces. A new survey of factory workers by Austin, Texas-based business software company Epicor reveals that high turnover is likely to remain a major feature of the manufacturing sector through 2023, and that many frontline workers tend toRead More

Need Workers? Hiring Job Seekers With a Criminal Record Can Be the Right Move

In a tight labor market, more companies are seeing the benefit of giving every candidate a fair chance. Any experienced hiring manager knows that sometimes the best talent comes from unexpected places. And as businesses navigate a persistently tight job market, they’re turning to traditionally overlooked talent pools—including job seekers with a criminal record, suchRead More

Here Comes the 60-Year Career

As people live longer, healthier lives, the traditional 40-year career will become a thing of the past. But that’s going to require a new mind-set—and a lot more planning.   By Carol Hymowitz Feb. 12, 2023 9:00 am ET Get ready for longer careers. Probably much longer. Charlotte Japp is setting the groundwork for it. Since graduating fromRead More

Jobs Market Parties Like It’s 1969

Blowout employment report doesn’t jibe with recent tech layoffs, but overall labor picture is a lot more buoyant By Justin Lahart As interest rates rise and companies tighten their belts, white-collar workers have taken the brunt of layoffs and job cuts, breaking with the usual pattern leading into a downturn. WSJ explains why many professionalsRead More